Marmon-Herrington Military Vehicles
• Introduction
All-Wheel Drive Conversion kits:
• Trucks
• Armoured cars
Tracked vehicles:
• Tractors
• Tanks
In service:
• Commonwealth
• Latin America
• Netherlands
• USA
Links
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Trucks converted with 
Marmon-Herrington All-Wheel Drive Conversion Kits

In the 1930s, when Marmon-Herrington had found that in addition to specialty vehicles there was a growing market for moderately priced all-wheel drive vehicles, they started to co-operate with Ford Motor Co. Large numbers of commercial Ford truck chassis were converted with Marmon-Herrington's All-Wheel Drive Conversion kits. 

These Ford/Marmon-Herrington trucks were bought in massive numbers by the military around the world. Below follows a list of countries that bought all-wheel drive chassis or chassis/cabs at Marmon-Herrington, and suited them for their own needs.

Marmon-Herrington's expertise on all-wheel drive vehicles was also called upon when the Canadian automotive industry geared up for war production: "Immediately after the war was declared, the Ford Motor Company of Canada were charged with the responsibility of developing a 4x4 truck for army use. Obviously, they had very little experience in this field [...] Consequently they went to the Marmon-Herrington Company, Indianapolis, who in peace time supplied conversion material to convert Standard Ford 4x2 trucks into 4x4 models for various commercial peace time usage. [...] these joints were unsuitable [...] [the weight of the more or less cab over engine design and heavy army wheels/tires put too much load on the front axle joints.] To solve this problem, "Bendix-Weiss and Rzeppa joints were chosen by General Motors and Ford respectively [...] [They later realized that the "Tracta" type was better but they were already tooled up with the above types, so left it as it was.] (The Design Record, Vol. 4, p. 27).
 

Australia
Belgium
Canada
Netherlands East Indies
USA

After conversion, data plates were fitted to the cab interior to show the truck was converted to all-wheel drive by the Marmon-Herrington Company and to instruct drivers about the shift patterns. Shown below, courtesy of Mike, is a typical set of these plates.
 



Sources:

[ Introduction | Trucks | Armoured Cars | Tractors | Tanks |
Commonwealth | Latin America | Netherlands | USA | Links

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